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Sunday 9 July 2017   photo 1/2

The Face of Water: A Translator on Beauty and Meaning in the Bible
by Sarah Ruden
->>->>->> http://shorl.com/diprejosofriky DOWNLOAD BOOK
A dazzling reconsideration of the original languages and texts of the Bible, in both the Old and the New Testaments, from the acclaimed scholar and translator of Classical literature (“The best translation of the Aeneid, certainly the best of our time" —Ursula Le Guin; “The first translation since Dryden that can be read as a great English poem in itself" —Garry Wills, The New York Review of Books) and author of Paul Among the People (“Astonishing . . . Superb" —Booklist, starred review). 
In The Face of Water, Sarah Ruden brilliantly and elegantly explains and celebrates the Bible’s writings. Singling out the most famous passages, such as the Genesis creation story, the Ten Commandments, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Beatitudes, Ruden reexamines and retranslates from the Hebrew and Greek what has been obscured and misunderstood over time. 
Making clear that she is not a Biblical scholar, cleric, theologian, or philosopher, Ruden—a Quaker—speaks plainly in this illuminating and inspiring book. She writes that while the Bible has always mattered profoundly, it is a book that in modern translations often lacks vitality, and she sets out here to make it less a thing of paper and glue and ink and more a live and loving text. 
Ruden writes of the early evolution, literary beauty, and transcendent ideals of the Hebrew Bible and the Greek New Testament, exploring how the Jews came to establish the greatest, most enduring book on earth as their regional strategic weakness found a paradoxical moral and spiritual strength through their writings, and how the Christians inherited and adapted this remarkable literary tradition. She writes as well about the crucial purposes of translation, not only for availability of texts but also for accountability in public life and as a reflection of society’s current concerns. 
She shows that it is the original texts that most clearly reveal our cherished values (both religious and secular), unlike the standard English translations of the Bible that mask even the yearning for freedom from slavery. The word “redemption" translated from Hebrew and Greek, meaning mercy for the exploited and oppressed, is more abstract than its original meaning—to buy a person back from captivity or slavery or some other distress. 
The Face of Water is as much a book about poetry, music, drama, raw humor, and passion as it is about the idealism of the Bible. Ruden’s book gives us an unprecedented, nuanced understanding of what this extraordinary document was for its earliest readers and what it can still be for us today
It does appear that some of the Jewish elite of the Babylonian Exile lived near Mesopotamian canalsBitch Planet and Another Castle - GrimoireSeven Impossibly Good Bits of Book Newsby Julie Danielson on July 7, 2017 This Week in http://romarbgingteje.blogcu.com/llamados-a-ser-hombres-de-integridad-manual-spanish-edition-jose-zapico/34079299 Bobbi Dumas on July 6, 2017 By Alan Cole Books, Arts & Manners Teams of Warriors Max

The Face of Water: A Translator on Beauty and Meaning in the Bible
by Sarah Ruden


->>->>->> http://shorl.com/diprejosofriky DOWNLOAD BOOK

A dazzling reconsideration of the original languages and texts of the Bible, in both the Old and the New Testaments, from the acclaimed scholar and translator of Classical literature (“The best translation of the Aeneid, certainly the best of our time" —Ursula Le Guin; “The first translation since Dryden that can be read as a great English poem in itself" —Garry Wills, The New York Review of Books) and author of Paul Among the People (“Astonishing . . . Superb" —Booklist, starred review). 

In The Face of Water, Sarah Ruden brilliantly and elegantly explains and celebrates the Bible’s writings. Singling out the most famous passages, such as the Genesis creation story, the Ten Commandments, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Beatitudes, Ruden reexamines and retranslates from the Hebrew and Greek what has been obscured and misunderstood over time. 

Making clear that she is not a Biblical scholar, cleric, theologian, or philosopher, Ruden—a Quaker—speaks plainly in this illuminating and inspiring book. She writes that while the Bible has always mattered profoundly, it is a book that in modern translations often lacks vitality, and she sets out here to make it less a thing of paper and glue and ink and more a live and loving text. 

Ruden writes of the early evolution, literary beauty, and transcendent ideals of the Hebrew Bible and the Greek New Testament, exploring how the Jews came to establish the greatest, most enduring book on earth as their regional strategic weakness found a paradoxical moral and spiritual strength through their writings, and how the Christians inherited and adapted this remarkable literary tradition. She writes as well about the crucial purposes of translation, not only for availability of texts but also for accountability in public life and as a reflection of society’s current concerns. 

She shows that it is the original texts that most clearly reveal our cherished values (both religious and secular), unlike the standard English translations of the Bible that mask even the yearning for freedom from slavery. The word “redemption" translated from Hebrew and Greek, meaning mercy for the exploited and oppressed, is more abstract than its original meaning—to buy a person back from captivity or slavery or some other distress. 

The Face of Water 
is as much a book about poetry, music, drama, raw humor, and passion as it is about the idealism of the Bible. Ruden’s book gives us an unprecedented, nuanced understanding of what this extraordinary document was for its earliest readers and what it can still be for us today



























It does appear that some of the Jewish elite of the Babylonian Exile lived near Mesopotamian canalsBitch Planet and Another Castle - GrimoireSeven Impossibly Good Bits of Book Newsby Julie Danielson on July 7, 2017 This Week in http://romarbgingteje.blogcu.com/llamados-a-ser-hombres-de-integridad-manual-spanish-edition-jose-zapico/34079299 Bobbi Dumas on July 6, 2017 By Alan Cole Books, Arts & Manners Teams of Warriors Max Boot reviews Oppose Any Foe: The Rise of Americas Special Operations Forces, by Mark MoyarBut intricate phrasing is easy for native English speakers; one of my professors reported that his two-year-old daughter had spontaneously come out http://bypass-cod4.xooit.eu/viewtopic.php?p=147 “What did you bring that book I didn’t want http://teamurtsnip.xooit.fr/viewtopic.php?p=155 be read to out of up for?"—with that bizarre series of prepositions and an adverb (“up"), no problem for the likes of us, but liable to drive a foreign student of English around the http://destzale.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-7.html either Hebrew or Greek, the words in that sentence would be much fewer, with concepts like “I want" and “what for" and “to be read to" and “bring up" expressed by single words, each containing substantial meaning http://www.scoop.it/t/ericwhiportva/p/4081363703/2017/07/09/low-carb-rezepte-diat-kochbuch-zum-abnehmen-stoffwechsel-beschleunigen-und-fett-verbrennen-german-edition-pascal-wolf often through their structure entailing close relationships with other wordsRudin http://blogs.rediff.com/sipetenkelgho/2017/07/09/sixencyclicalsaddressedtoparticularpeoples:ilfermoproposito,tribuscirciter,pienil'animo,iamdudum,lacrimabilistatu,singulariquadam/ diverges from standard academic tone, weaving her own personal stories together with her intellectual task; all this makes the reader feel as if they are spending time with a funand very smartfriendPress.[9][10] Homer (2005)She writes that while the Bible has always mattered profoundly, it is a book that in modern translations http://www.scoop.it/t/crabmenrarifor/p/4081363702/2017/07/09/unpath-d-waters lacks vitality, and she sets out here to make it less a thing of paper and glue and ink and more a live and loving text^ Swaim, Barton (2017-05-26)Army, 18151917, by JRetrieved 2017-05-31"The Babel of Biblical Translation"PoetryGet the NR Magazine App iPad/iPhone Android Load More Contents May 1, 2017 Volume XIX, No2015-12-04The book is often a master class in translation and Bible studies Sarah Ruden The Face of Water A Translator on Beauty and Meaning in the Bible Pantheon 2016 New Books in Arts & LettersNew Books in Biblical StudiesNew Books in Christian StudiesNew Books in LanguageNew Books in Literary StudiesNew Books in Politics & SocietyNew Books in ReligionNew Books in Religion & FaithNew Books Network May 17, 2017 Garrett Brown On this program, we talk to Sarah Ruden about her new book, The Face of Water: A Translator on Beauty and Meaning in the Bible (Pantheon, 2017)There was a problem adding your email addressPantheonHere is the King James Version:1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.3 For http://golfjefi.aqlaunch.com//forums/viewtopic.php?p=39433417&gid=544789#39433417 they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.4 How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my http://cepforicysri.wapka.mobi/forum2_theme_112967503.xhtml?tema=154 hand forget her cunning.6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.7 Remember, O Lord, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem; who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof.8 O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us.9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.What is this scene of lamenting and cherishing and threatening? It is so vivid and so specific that I’m convinced it was http://aosu3spaccon.xooit.com/viewtopic.php?p=3469 on direct experienceSarah Ruden holds a Ph.DRetrieved 2017-05-31She has taught Latin, English, and writing at Harvard, Yale, and the University of Cape Town and has been a tutor for the South African Education and Environment Project, an education-enrichment nonprofit in Cape TownRetrieved 2017-05-31References[edit] 5d8a9798ff Sarah Elizabeth Ruden is an American writer of poetry, essays, translations of Classic literature, and popularizations of Biblical philology, religious criticism and ...Sarah Ruden is a poet, translator, essayist, and popularizer of Biblical linguisticsCloth 2014 | ISBN 9780812246254 | $32.50s ...Drawing readers closer to Augustine's intent than any previous version, Sarah Ruden's fresh, dynamic translation of Confessions puts a glaring spotlight on the ...Ruden and the Aeneid'By Sarah Ruden The University of ...Mar 12, 2009 ..Translated by Len Krisak

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