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Tuesday 18 September 2018   photo 7/8

Mother Torrent-----------------------------------------DOWNLOAD: http://urllio.com/r2vb7 -----------------------------------------A mother desperately searches for the killer who framed her son for a girl's horrific murder.In a province in Pusan, South Korea, the slow Yoon Do-joon is a young man overprotected by his mother that works with acupuncture and herbs and does not like his worthless and reckless friend Jin-tae. When a Mercedes runs over Do-joon, Jin-tae follows the hit-and-run driver with Do-joon and find the car parked in a golf club. Jin-tae breaks the side mirror of the car and Do-joon collects golf balls lost in a lake. When they see the cart with the driver and passengers of the Mercedes, there is a fight and they end in the police station. During the night, Do-joon walks to the bar Manhattan to meet Jin-tae that does not arrive; when Do-joon returns home, he sees the easy Moon Ah-jung walking alone in an alley and entering in an abandoned house. On the next morning, Ah-jung is found dead on the terrace of the house. The incompetent detectives find a golf ball near her body and they conclude that Do-joon is the killer. Doo- joon is arrested; signs a confession and is charged of murder. However, his mother follows her instincts believing that her son is innocent and the scapegoat of the incompetent police department and seeks the truth disclosing a dreadful reality.A South Korean schoolgirl has been killed, and she's just good looking enough to make people care. Who is the culprit? Nobody knows. Could it be the local village idiot? Quite possibly, but also possibly not. Whatever the case, the authorities are convinced of his guilt.
Can Yoon Do-joon's mother reach the truth of this mystery before the police send an innocent man to prison? Will Jin-tae get the money he's demanding? Who burned down the house of the old scrap dealer? Why is Sae-beauk Song such a dick?
This one's a slooooooooooooooooooow burn-even by the excruciatingly glacial standards of South Korean cinema-but the payoff is worth it.
I rate Madeo at 26.64 on the Haglee Scale, which works out as a relentless 8/10 on IMDB.So we want films that challenge, engage, but don't waste the engagement on a trifle gasp. It's easy to unsettle, a murder or rape; the real challenge is what next? How do you open us up? This one's a great example, but you'll have to wait for the last scene.
A few things are first established before the crucial crime. A hit- and- run introduces random agency in a world where violence can swoop down from nowhere and wreck lives. The altercation with the broken car mirror is for us to understand that the savant boy is an unreliable narrator, susceptible to stories. And his relationship with the mother is portrayed to teeter between the merely awkward and the unacceptable, so that we first have to struggle with our own selves before we can empathize with either.
And then it becomes about us. How we are susceptible to stories, unreliable narrators of what we witness. How empathy is a matter of inheriting a story as though it was our own child in it, going on faith. Do we believe the guileless boy as his mother does? Do we trust that he remembers when he does? Our own visual testimony?
It is about us having to struggle to empathize. About us, having empathized, being uncertain of the judgement. This is a hard earned empathy, not Spielberg's mushy one where cute lost boys face obvious evil, evil here being the inability to even know about it.
— it's really vital to realize that the boy's original impression of the crucial scene is his own 'real' subsequent memory of it, the event having been reconfigured into view in just the way we first see it. It confuses because that is what he recalls having happened, he's not lying.
— the important discovery of the vi

Mother Torrent-----------------------------------------DOWNLOAD: http://urllio.com/r2vb7 -----------------------------------------A mother desperately searches for the killer who framed her son for a girl's horrific murder.In a province in Pusan, South Korea, the slow Yoon Do-joon is a young man overprotected by his mother that works with acupuncture and herbs and does not like his worthless and reckless friend Jin-tae. When a Mercedes runs over Do-joon, Jin-tae follows the hit-and-run driver with Do-joon and find the car parked in a golf club. Jin-tae breaks the side mirror of the car and Do-joon collects golf balls lost in a lake. When they see the cart with the driver and passengers of the Mercedes, there is a fight and they end in the police station. During the night, Do-joon walks to the bar Manhattan to meet Jin-tae that does not arrive; when Do-joon returns home, he sees the easy Moon Ah-jung walking alone in an alley and entering in an abandoned house. On the next morning, Ah-jung is found dead on the terrace of the house. The incompetent detectives find a golf ball near her body and they conclude that Do-joon is the killer. Doo- joon is arrested; signs a confession and is charged of murder. However, his mother follows her instincts believing that her son is innocent and the scapegoat of the incompetent police department and seeks the truth disclosing a dreadful reality.A South Korean schoolgirl has been killed, and she's just good looking enough to make people care. Who is the culprit? Nobody knows. Could it be the local village idiot? Quite possibly, but also possibly not. Whatever the case, the authorities are convinced of his guilt.

Can Yoon Do-joon's mother reach the truth of this mystery before the police send an innocent man to prison? Will Jin-tae get the money he's demanding? Who burned down the house of the old scrap dealer? Why is Sae-beauk Song such a dick?

This one's a slooooooooooooooooooow burn-even by the excruciatingly glacial standards of South Korean cinema-but the payoff is worth it.

I rate Madeo at 26.64 on the Haglee Scale, which works out as a relentless 8/10 on IMDB.So we want films that challenge, engage, but don't waste the engagement on a trifle gasp. It's easy to unsettle, a murder or rape; the real challenge is what next? How do you open us up? This one's a great example, but you'll have to wait for the last scene.

A few things are first established before the crucial crime. A hit- and- run introduces random agency in a world where violence can swoop down from nowhere and wreck lives. The altercation with the broken car mirror is for us to understand that the savant boy is an unreliable narrator, susceptible to stories. And his relationship with the mother is portrayed to teeter between the merely awkward and the unacceptable, so that we first have to struggle with our own selves before we can empathize with either.

And then it becomes about us. How we are susceptible to stories, unreliable narrators of what we witness. How empathy is a matter of inheriting a story as though it was our own child in it, going on faith. Do we believe the guileless boy as his mother does? Do we trust that he remembers when he does? Our own visual testimony?

It is about us having to struggle to empathize. About us, having empathized, being uncertain of the judgement. This is a hard earned empathy, not Spielberg's mushy one where cute lost boys face obvious evil, evil here being the inability to even know about it.

— it's really vital to realize that the boy's original impression of the crucial scene is his own 'real' subsequent memory of it, the event having been reconfigured into view in just the way we first see it. It confuses because that is what he recalls having happened, he's not lying.

— the important discovery of the victim's cell phone leads to a story that trickles to the mother through three levels of narrators, the victim inside a (stoned) boy's memory being told to a third person. The phone itself is full of pictures of men, each one potentially the culprit.

— later in the film there is a reconstruction of the original scene of the murder, as the savant finally remembers a man in the house, and this man is later found and gives his own testimony. This is so good it's worthy of the photo reconstruction scene in Bladerunner.

— this recalling is marvelously framed through windows and unclean glass. At its most pure, the film is this glimpse through hazy glass at a troubled boy trying to remember, it's about moving walls around to create that space where something horrible happened.

— the film begins with an image of the mother, at that point simply she's just a middle-aged woman to us, inexplicably dancing in a field. In the end we know at what point in the story this takes place but the gesture remains wonderfully ambiguous.

Which brings me to the last scene. The whole film is meant to appeal to a broad audience, though it presents by no means simple and uncomplicated truths. But the last scene is one of the most striking I have seen.

Great cinema begins where drama and metaphor end, it's hard to describe what that next step is, in short we'd say transcendent. The context of narrative is always illusory, it is the opportunity for us to be aware in a certain sense. This is why it doesn't matter what's the answer to the mystery in Blowup, or why the hayloft barn ablaze in Zerkalo is not encountered as the result of any logical causation.

In the last scene we have that step beyond causation into ambiguous air. The mother has been sent off in a bus with other middle-aged people. She prickles her knee with her acupuncturist's needle, hitting that spot "that eases the heart". See what happens in the film. What is the urge that lifts everyone from their seat?

There's a lot of great Asian cinema I'm being exposed to lately, and that scene is the third most captivating in an Asian film of the decade I've seen, all three involving physical activity of some sort as transcendence, two of them dancing. Find my second favorite in Sharasojyu.Bong is so concerned with whodunit that his creaky genre mechanics diminish Kim's determined performance.A doting mother (Hye-ja Kim) of a mentally-challenged young man is devastated when son Yoon Do-joon (Won Bin) is arrested for the murder of a young girl, Moon Ah-jung (Hee-ra Mun), and tricked into signing a confession. Certain that her son is innocent, Mother begins her own investigation into Ah-Jung's background and the events that happened on the night of the murder. Mother was filmed from a screenplay co-written by South Korean screenwriters Park Eun-kyo and Bong Joon-ho (who also directed the movie). Mother worked as an herbalist in a store and performed illegal acupuncture treatments (she was not licensed) on the side. Her employer wanted Mother to lie to customers about the inferior quality herbs they imported from China. To force Mother into compliance, the employer reminded her of how her illegal acupuncture practice would reflect upon the business and upon her husband, some high-ranking official. "Deodeok root" is the root of the Codonopsis lanceolata plant, known in English as "bonnet bellflower." It is a popular ingredient in Korean cooking and can be found in various dishes, such as kimchi, vegetable salads, pancakes, etc. "Gugija" (Lycium species) is known under several English names, such as "Chinese matrimony vine", "wolfberries", and "goji berries." The red berries often make their way into soups, salads, and herbal teas. Mother contends that it's good for Do-joon's virility. Ah-jung's two boyfriends explain that she took photos with her "pervert" phone of everyone with whom she had sex, so it's reasonable to conclude that the junkman was one of her customers. This is best evidenced in the scene where the junkman explains how he came to be in the abandoned house. He is seen spreading a mat on the floor and measuring out the rice with which he intends to pay Ah-jung (aka "Rice Cake Girl"). One of Ah-jung's girlfriends had the skill to silence the sound of a cellphone when it took photos. Ah-jung used it to take photos of her sex partners. Several explanations have been offered, including that she was a single mother and very poor, but the most generally-accepted explanation is that Mother couldn't bear to live with Do-joon's retardation so she decided to take both of their lives. She chose to use an insecticide called Lone Star, but it was too weak and only made them sick for two days. Some viewers have entertained the possibility that it was the poison that actually caused Do-joon's brain damage. Since the film does not offer an explanation, it's up to each viewer to decide which scenario makes the most sense to them. Mother finally obtains Ah-jung's cellphone from Ah-jung's Granny (Gin-goo Kim). She takes it to the prison to show the photos to Do-joon who remembers seeing the junkman at the abandoned house where Ah-jung was killed. Mother recognizes him as the man from whom she bought the umbrella and goes out to see him. Posing as a volunteer worker for Hyeminwon, an organization that provides free medical checks for elderly people living alone, she gets the junkman talking about what he saw the night Ah-jung was killed. He describes how Ah-jung was being followed by a boy who accused her of not liking boys, so Ah-jung tossed a heavy rock at him. When Ah-jung calls the boy a "stupid retard", the boy threw the rock back at Ah-jung, hitting her in the head and killing her. The boy then carried the body to the roof and left it hanging over the ledge. Mother realizes that he's talking about her son and informs him that the police are going to re-open the investigation and release Do-joon in a few days. When the junkman describes how the boy did this weird thing with his thumbs on his temples and starts to phone the police about what he saw, Mother repeatedly hits him in the head with a large pipe wrench and burns down the house to cover the murder. Days later, Inspector Je-mun (Je-mun Yun) informs Mother that they have caught the killer, Crazy JP escaped from the sanitarium, and that they are going to release Do-joon because they found blood on JP's shirt that matched that of Ah-jung. JP has denied that he killed Ah-jung, claiming that she got a nosebleed on his shirt. Mother requests to meet JP and finds that he is a Down's Syndrome child. When she finds out that JP has no mother (to fight for him), she breaks down and cries. Do-joon is released from prison. On his way back, he meets Jin-tae in his new car and learns that the junk dealer's place burned down. Picking through the rubble, Do-joon finds Mother's acupuncture needle case. He later informs Mother that he thinks JP might have put Ah-jung's body on the roof so that someone would find her and get medical help for her, because she was bleeding. In the final scenes, Mother is going off on a "Thank You Parents" bus tour. Do-joon buys her some food to eat and returns her partially-burned acupuncture box. "How could you leave this lying around?" he asks Mother. Mother then hurriedly boards the bus. While the rest of the passengers dance in the aisle of the bus, Mother runs an acupuncture needle into her thigh and then starts to dance. Dancing in the aisles of tour buses was commonly seen on Korean tour buses up to a few years ago. Now. with stricter rules and sharper fines, it's not as common anymore. Several times during the film, Mother says that she knows of an acupuncture point on the thigh. She calls it "a meridian point that can loosen the knots in your heart and clear all the horrible memories from your mind." She did it to herself to erase the memories of her attempts to kill herself and Do-joon when he was young, her murder of the junkman, and her son's involvement in the killing of Ah-jung.The film does not provide a definitive answer, leaving the audience to ponder four possibilities: (1) Jin-tae (Goo Jin), (2) the junkman, (3) Do-joon, and (4) Crazy JP from the sanitarium. Jin-tae is ruled out early in the movie. The majority of viewers conclude that the junkman's version of the murder is the truthful one. This is actually evidenced when the police make Do-joon demonstrate the events using a dummy, and he clearly shows them how Ah-jung's head was hit with a rock and her body carried to the roof and placed over the ledge for someone to notice it and get medical attention. In the end, it is Ah-jung's blood on Crazy JP's shirt that the police find most suspicious. a5c7b9f00b http://parchpichard.jugem.jp/?eid=268 http://www.nookl.com/article/338019/niagaras-fury-online-free http://adnimott.jugem.jp/?eid=327 http://beipartjunggo.blogviajes.com/1537290338/ http://othupev.jugem.jp/?eid=301 http://dayviews.com/camati/526827248/ http://rayvercha.jugem.jp/?eid=308 http://moyresla.jugem.jp/?eid=315 http://dayviews.com/toutegar/526827249/ http://www.nookl.com/article/338018/the-assignment-malayalam-movie-download

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